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February 28, 2012
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Does sight exist not to see, or hearing not to hear?

So too does existence not exist to achieve imperfection but rather perfection. More still, existence tends towards perfection and not imperfection.


This idea is scoffed at in many ways, one being this: reality cannot be anything other than 'it is.' I.e., nature's imperfections is reality's perfection. We cannot speak of ideal perfection for we do not know it. We cannot know it. Nothing exists beyond 'it is.'

What these ones do not recognize is that every motion is a motion "for" or "towards" some end. Every motion either does not achieve that end or achieves that end in degrees of perfection.

Unconscious, we may feel like we act with no purpose or that all happens around us without purpose. Yet, this is where we must look inward at ourselves: who do I want to become? In what manner am I becomming that person?

We may be surprised that the end we desire is not the one we are moving towards. We may, at times, be surprised by the low, imperfect, and inconsequential ends we strive for.

In Christ, I believe, we find that someone we may strive for. But see what a marvelous perfection it is!

Christ bore weakness and himself was weak. He bore weakness and was strong. His smallness only magnified his glory. The perfection we seek is not in losing ourselves, but dying to ourselves such that we regain ourselves completely. Even 'it is' strives towards 'it is perfect.' The fact that we are individuals does not mean we must seek to lose individuality, but claim it totally. This is what a relationship with God is.

Do we, then, exist to tend towards imperfection, or perfection?
A brief reflection with a whole new section added.

The first half was written about 2 weeks ago, and the latter half today.

I wanted to address two things:

That perfection we cannoy see does not mean it is not there.

That perfection does not always mean "one and immutable."

It's a brief reflection meant to assist you and not meant to be an academic account, though I certainly drew on more academic accounts when thinking of this.

Comments are always welcome; questions likewise.

M

P.S. Still working on the piece on Original Sin.
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:iconbishop-myriel43:
bishop-myriel43 Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Student Writer
One Jesuit professor here might say, "Whatever exists, exists to be more full and perfect." Of course, he wouldn't quite put it as awkwardly as I have, but say it in flowing and poetic Filipino :D

I haven't even gotten to second-year philosophy yet, and I'm already learning a little. Thank you for your wonderfully written reflection.
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:icontesm:
TESM Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
I'm happy the faith is still being taught there in the Philippines.

Philosophy is very difficult if you're not humble, but a heart that is set on humility, especially humbling your own intellect by force, is a great start to learning more than you thought possible. But likewise, it takes courage to find what is good and true and hold onto it.

I've come to realize that if philosophy is the "love of wisdom" and Jesus is Wisdom itself, then seeking Him can make us philosophers indeed--the reading dedicated on St. Bartholomew's day says as much.


Thanks again!
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:iconroxas1296:
roxas1296 Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I had always thought of the Christian lifestyle as imperfection striving towards the ends of perfection. Do you agree with that?
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:icontesm:
TESM Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Hm, I could, perhaps.

When you say imperfection I suppose you mean us?

And insofar as you mean perfection, what do you mean? (obviously we have a context, but let's see what's there when we clarify)
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:iconroxas1296:
roxas1296 Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2012  Student Digital Artist
I've actually just concluded a discussion with an atheist on the matter of perfection. (She insisted that God could not be perfect because the world we observe isn't. She also quoted the Second Law of Thermodynamics but didn't really explain why that meant anything. :shrug: )

Our view of perfection (I believe what you referred to as "ideal perfection") is oftentimes not what perfection actually is.

God is perfect. So, at least to my understanding, perfection is everything that God is.

We are all flawed and imperfect beings. However, as Christians, we always strive to become models of Christ. In other words, we are constantly seeking to become more like God. That's why I believe that Christians are imperfect beings striving towards the ends of perfection.

Additionally, although I don't understand the concept fully, I could point out the fact that imperfection cannot be mixed with perfection. It is for this reason that hell exists, and it is also for this reason that God appears to us through physical mediums rather than face-to-face. (Jesus is technically still a physical medium.)
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:icontesm:
TESM Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Yea, that argument doesn't work because it either assumes a sort of pantheistic reality or she doesn't grasp the relationship between creator and creation.

Additionally, although I don't understand the concept fully, I could point out the fact that imperfection cannot be mixed with perfection. It is for this reason that hell exists, and it is also for this reason that God appears to us through physical mediums rather than face-to-face. (Jesus is technically still a physical medium.)

Well, maybe.

There is still the transfiguration of Jesus and his appearances after the Resurrection.

That thought is also largely Middle-Platonic and doesn't consider the immanence of God. God's perfection is so great that he can even take on imperfection, which is most powerfully expressed in the Incarnation and the Cross. His is a perfection that confounds our perception of what "perfect" is by even making himself intimately known in imperfection.

So Jesus isn't "technically" a physical medium since he was fully God and fully man.
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:iconroxas1296:
roxas1296 Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2012  Student Digital Artist
True, I suppose.

And that would also explain why Jesus never worried about being "unclean" in terms of the laws God passed in Exodus, Leviticus and Numbers.
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:icontesm:
TESM Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
You see, the passage where Jesus says 'anything that goes into the body goes through to the toilet. But what enters the heart is more important.'

But, look here now. The purpose of the Old Law was to make men obedient and it was meant to train their hearts. The whole Old Testament attests to the fact that "the sacrifice of the unjust man is an abomination, but the supplication of the just is the Lord's delight."

So, the purpose of not being "unclean" was because Jesus' charity and justice were of God. And this is why he permitted some men to be 'unjust' under the law because their hearts and faith were what was pleasing to God. Recall by this that I don't mean the many wicked people who deny all law and ritual (like many who just debase Catholicism) and say that as long as I love God.

Only idiots feel they can do it all on their own and don't need guidance. This is why many people who say they just use the bible or pray to God are really praying to themselves in a small way. What I mean is that we should not see the law as abolished but fulfilled. That the purpose of the law is supposed to culture our hearts to have charity with ourselves and others as well as harmony with creation. Catholicism teaches that ritual and laws were passed down by the community and the Apostles to help us deal with the many spiritual crisis that attack us. The Jewish law was structured similarly.

I know I'm throwing a lot out at once, but it's a big topic. Sorry! Maybe I typed too fast for my own good so it seems a little mean or jagged.
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:iconroxas1296:
roxas1296 Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2012  Student Digital Artist
You see, the passage where Jesus says 'anything that goes into the body goes through to the toilet. But what enters the heart is more important.'

...what?

The purpose of the Old Law was to make men obedient and it was meant to train their hearts.

Very true. People often forget that when they claim that the Old Testament and the New Testament contradict.

And this is why he permitted some men to be 'unjust' under the law because their hearts and faith were what was pleasing to God.

Like the woman in the Gospel reading today who had hemmorages and touched Jesus' cloak to be made clean?

What I mean is that we should not see the law as abolished but fulfilled.

It's very difficult to be Christian if you don't believe this.

Maybe I typed too fast for my own good so it seems a little mean or jagged.

Not at all!
And even if it did, don't worry about it. I've read through the comments that people send you. I can understand your frustration in dealing with certain topics, and especially the frustration of compiling many topics together in a concise explanation to answer a single question.
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:iconwontdieacopy71:
WontDieACopy71 Featured By Owner Apr 5, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You have beautiful concepts. I love your writing. It's the kind of writing I like to read aloud to myself :)
I'm so intrigued by your ideas, too. You put the thoughts I've always had into words and it's like I'm reading my own thoughts!
Great job!
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